Upcoming

Events Semester Two

 

Thursday 17th of January 2019 – 11am

Economic and Social History Seminars

Title: Economic crises, central banks’ balance sheet policy and long-term intervention in industry: comparing Italy, France and Britain, 1920-1960.

Valerio Cerretano (University of Glasgow)

Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House, Bute Gardens. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

 

Wednesday 23rd of January 2019 – 3.30pm

GRAMNET Seminars Series

Title: Lights in the Distance: Reporting Europe’s refugee crisis

Daniel Trilling

Abstract: Each of the thousands of people who come to Europe in search of asylum every year brings with them a unique experience. But their stories don’t end there. In Lights in the Distance (Picador, 2018), journalist Daniel Trilling draws on years of reporting to build a portrait of the refugee crisis, seen through the eyes of the people who experienced it first-hand. As the European Union has grown, so has a tangled and often violent system designed to filter out unwanted migrants – one that extends from the border into cities. Most of us became aware of the crisis when it apparently reached its peak in 2015, but the roots go much deeper. Visiting camps and hostels, sneaking into detention centres and delving into his own family’s history of displacement, Trilling weaves together the stories of people he met and followed from country to country. In doing so, he shows that the terms commonly used to define them – refugee or economic migrant, legal or illegal, deserving or undeserving – fall woefully short of capturing the complex realities.

Bio: Daniel Trilling is a London-based journalist who writes about migration, nationalism and borders for publications including the GuardianNew York Times and London Review of Books. His first book, Bloody Nasty People: the Rise of Britain’s Far Right, was nominated for the 2013 Orwell Prize.  His new book, Lights in the Distance, is published by Picador.

Everyone is welcome.  If you would like to attend, please RSVP to David.Wright@glasgow.ac.uk.

 

Wednesday 23rd of January 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: Brexit, making migrants of citizens? The British in Europe beyond the illusion of Free Movement

Michaela Benson (Goldsmiths)

Abstract: This paper focuses on the lesser known story of Brexit and its implications for British citizens living in Europe. It moves beyond Brexit as a legal process—the terms on which they are currently able to live in other European member states transformed, their European citizenship removed—tracing what is exposed once the illusion of Free Movement is shattered. Drawing on ongoing qualitative research with British citizens living in France conducted for the BrExpats research project (https://brexitbritsabroad.com), I examine how proposed changes to their legal status and the current scrutiny of their lawful residence are experienced and mitigated by these Britons. In legal terms, Brexit marks a moment when these Britons are reclassified as migrants in the places they live and work, the structural privileges that they previously held as British citizens reframed.  My focus on the real lives shaped through this transformation offer insights into the differential impacts of Brexit on their lives, in the process making visible the instabilities of such privileges. However, as I argue, these instabilities were always present but masked by the legal privilege of Free Movement, in practice overlooked as the lives of British citizens in France were rarely subjected to scrutiny by local authorities. Through this focus, I critically evaluate how Brexit interplays with questions of citizenship and migration to progress a theoretical and conceptual agenda that questions how research on migration and citizenship can work with and against governmental norms.

Bio: Michaela Benson joined Goldsmiths in 2013 after working at the universities of York and Bristol. She is internationally renowned for her contributions to the sociology of migration, and her research on the class, home, identity and belonging. Michaela is currently a research leader for the project BrExpats: freedom of movement, citizenship and Brexit in the lives of Britons resident in the European Union funded by the UK in a Changing EU. Her earlier work on the British in rural France received awards and recognition including the prestigious Sociological Review Fellowship, which enabled her to write The British in Rural France (2011, MUP), a book subsequently shortlisted for the British Sociological Association’s Philip Abrams Memorial Prize (2012). She has additionally pursued her interest in lifestyle migration through research with North American populations living in Panama funded by the British Academy.

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Wednesday 23rd of January 2019 – 5.45pm doors for 6.00pm start

GRAMNET Film Series

The Dead Nation
Documentary: Romania (2017)
Director: Radu Jude
Running time: 83 mins
Romanian with English subtitles

The Dead Nation is a documentary-essay, which shows a stunning collection of photographs from a Romanian small town in the 1930’s and 1940’s. The soundtrack, composed mostly from excerpts taken from the diary of a Jewish doctor from the same era, shows us what the photographs do not: the rising of the anti-Semitism and eventually a harrowing depiction of the Romanian Holocaust, a topic which is not very talked about in the contemporary Romanian society.‌

Our film series is organised in partnership with BEMIS Scotland and The Iona Community, with the support of the University of Glasgow’s Equality and Diversity Unit.

Screenings are accompanied by Q&A sessions for everyone to share views and thoughts in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Venue: Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

 

Thursday 24th of January 2019 – 11am

Economic and Social History Seminars

Title: Beyond Thomas Glover: Western Merchants and the Hakodate Trade, 1854-84

Steve Ivings (Kyoto University)

Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House, Bute Gardens. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

 

Wednesday 6th of February 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Speaker: Martin Crook (University of London)

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Wednesday 6th of February – 5.45pm doors for 6.00pm start

GRAMNET Film Series

Piripkura
Documentary: Brazil (2017)
Director: Renata Terra, Bruno Jorge, Mariana Oliva
Running time: 81 mins
Portuguese with English subtitles

In this chronicle of an expedition, the Amazonian habitat of the only two nomadic Piripkura, can only be protected if there is proof they are still living there.

Two of the last three members of the Piripkura still live as nomads in the Amazon rainforest, in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso. Their most important possession is a torch that was lit in 1998 and has remained so ever since. The area where they live is encircled by farms and sawmills, whose almost inevitable expansion is taking place through violent means. This area of rainforest can only keep its protected status if there’s proof that the two men, Pakyî and Tamandua, are still living there. Coordinator Jair Candor treks into the jungle in search of them, sometimes accompanied by their sole surviving family member, their cousin Rita. Through this film, the crew provides proof of the two men’s existence. Piripkura sheds light on the tragedy befalling indigenous Amazon people—the systematic violence used against them is a constant menacing presence.‌

Our film series is organised in partnership with BEMIS Scotland and The Iona Community, with the support of the University of Glasgow’s Equality and Diversity Unit.

Screenings are accompanied by Q&A sessions for everyone to share views and thoughts in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Venue: Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

 

Thursday 7th of February 2019 – 11am

Economic and Social History Seminars

Title: Is coffee a poverty crop? Conspicuous and inconspicuous consumption in the Angolan coffee economy after WWII

Jelmer Vos (University of Glasgow)

Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House, Bute Gardens. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

 

Thursday 7th of February 2019 – 3pm

Urban Studies Seminars

Title: The circulation of the Barcelona Model in Latin America: comparative policy learning in Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro

Dr Gabriel Silvestre (University of Sheffield)

Abstract: Three decades on, Barcelona still remains a powerful reference in urban policy and management whose expertise, narratives and symbols are mobilised by promoters and learners in their attempts to distil and apply ‘best practices’. Latin America has been an important space where the banner of the ‘Barcelona Model’ has circulated and enacted as early as the 1980s and 1990s where it was argued that it could represent a significant market as long as there is a ‘generous offer to transfer technology, training of human capital and modern infrastructures’ (Borja, 1992: 23-24). This paper examines the establishment of these early networks in Latin America and the circulation of knowledge that took place between policy actors from Barcelona and the cities of Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. Through a comparative analysis of the policy exchanges crystallised around the project for Puerto Madero waterfront renewal and Rio de Janeiro’s strategic planning, it is argued that they were not merely discreet cases of mobilisation of expert knowledge to particular policy problems. Rather, they emerged as relational products from evolving disparate networks as policy opportunities for all the parts involved, while being contested by those excluded from it. Inasmuch as waterfront renewal and strategic planning became to constitute ‘best practices’, they also prefigured the articulation of what became the ‘Barcelona Model’.

Venue: Boyd Orr, Room 611

 

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: Queer Muslim Challenges to the Understanding of LGBT Rights: decolonizing human rights through intersectionality

Momin Rahman (Trent University, Canada)

Abstract: This talk draws on the theoretical and methodological aspects of an ongoing research project on LGBT Muslims.  I have three main aims in the talk. First, I use intersectional analysis to deconstruct the assumed opposition between Muslims and LGBT rights. I focus on LGBT Muslim identities and experiences which disrupt the dichotomous positioning of mainstream Muslim and mainstream LGBT identities and politics. This move encompasses both a theoretical use of intersectionality and a related methodological approach to standpoint research.  The second aim is to move from theoretical inquiry to practical politics, relying here on the praxis element of intersectionality.  Using the interview data from the project, I demonstrate how practical strategies for equity practices derive from the critical theoretical frame of intersectionality. The final aim is to show how intersectional theories and methods can aid in decolonizing our knowledge of both LGBT and Muslim politics and move us towards a more practical deployment of human rights strategies that build solidarity rather directing us to think of oppression in one dimension.

Bio: Momin Rahman is a Professor of Sociology at Trent University in Canada. His current research is on the conflicts between LGBT identities and Muslim cultures, and the experiences of LGBT Muslims, including a funded research project on LGBT Muslims in Canada.  He has presented this work at international academic conferences and at private policy meetings at the United Nations Human Rights Council and Wilton Park, the UK Foreign Office think tank.  He has published over 30 chapters and articles and 3 books: Homosexualities, Muslim Cultures and Modernity, (2014, Palgrave Macmillan), Gender and Sexuality (2010, with Stevi Jackson, Polity) and Sexuality and Democracy (2000, Edinburgh University Press).

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Wednesday 20th of February 2019 – 3.30pm

GRAMNET Seminars Series

Speaker: Maria Hagan, University of Cambridge

Everyone is welcome.  If you would like to attend, please RSVP to David.Wright@glasgow.ac.uk.

Venue: Room 250, Main Building, University of Glasgow. Tea/coffee and home baking will be served from 3.00pm in the Atrium.

 

Wednesday 20th of February 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: Beyond the Multiplex: Audiences for Specialised Film in English Regions

Bridgette Wessels, Matt Hanchard, Peter Merrington (University of Glasgow)

Abstract: This paper discusses an innovative research methodology, developed for the AHRC-funded project, ‘Beyond the Multiplex: Audiences for Specialised Film in English Regions’ (https://www.beyondthemultiplex.net). It combines mixed-methods research with a computational ontology to understand how we might enable a wider range of audiences to participate in a more diverse film culture, which embraces the wealth of films beyond mainstream film. It also addresses how we might optimise the cultural value of broadening the range of people engaging with those less-familiar films.  The research asks how audiences engage with and form in different ways around non-mainstream films, including small-scale UK, foreign language, documentary, and archival films, alongside films with unconventional narratives, themes, or cinematic techniques. Drawing on Livingstone’s (1998) argument that audiences are relational, interactive, and embedded within diverse sets of relationships between people and media forms, we present the methodology as one that addresses a key challenge for audience research – how to capture the richness of audience experiences in the wider context of cultural provision and access.

Bio: Bridgette Wessels research focuses on social change, media including digital media and cultural participation. She has extensive research experience in the area of digital culture in a wide range of areas, such as public sphere, the creative and cultural industries, media and new media, e-services, and digital culture in everyday life studies. She has written 6 books including Open Data and the Knowledge society (Amsterdam University Press), Social Change: process and Context (Palgrave, 2014), Understanding he Internet: a socio-cultural perspective(Palgrave). Bios for the group can be found here: https://www.beyondthemultiplex.net

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Thursday 21st of February 2019 – 11am

Economic and Social History Seminars

Title: Masters of the Universe: Yuppies, Masculinity and Financial Capitalism in 1980s Britain.

Amy Edwards (University of Bristol)

Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House, Bute Gardens. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

 

Wednesday 27th of February 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: The Contested Translation of International Human Rights Norms in the UK: Reconstructing the Prehistory of the Human Rights Act 1998

René Wolfsteller (The University of Halle-Wittenberg, Germany)

Abstract: This paper takes the 20th anniversary of the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA) as an opportunity to critically examine the Act’s prehistory in order to illuminate the reasons for its persistent contestation. Drawing on Sally Merry’s legal anthropology of international human rights, it reconstructs the key factors from the postwar history of British bill of rights campaigns that led to the Act’s introduction in its particular form. Unlike the existing literature highlighting norm socialization, pressure from the judiciary and strategic lobbying from civil society groups as decisive factors for Britain’s human rights change, this paper argues that the HRA is the product of a translation process of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into the British constitutional structure. Yet, while the HRA was designed to formally preserve parliamentary sovereignty, this structural translation was not matched with a rhetorical translation of ECHR rights as fundamental domestic norms for the legitimate exercise of governmental power. This mismatch created a perceived gap in the HRA’s legitimacy and is part of the reason for its lack of public support. Therefore the paper concludes that the sustainable domestic institutionalization of international human rights requires both their structural and rhetorical translation, even in Western liberal democracies from which these norms originated in the first place.

Bio: René Wolfsteller is Research Fellow and Academic Coordinator of the Graduate School “Society and Culture in Motion” at the University of Halle-Wittenberg, Germany. He completed his PhD in Politics at the University of Glasgow on the effectiveness of the British Human Rights Regime. His research focuses on the domestic institutionalisation and translation of international human rights norms, and on the role of national human rights institutions (NHRIs) in these processes. René holds an MA in Political Theory from the Universities of Frankfurt and Darmstadt, and a BA in Social Sciences, Philosophy, and Political Sciences from the University of Leipzig. He is co-editor, with Benjamin Gregg, of a special issue of The International Journal of Human Rights on “The Human Rights State in theory and deployment”, Vol. 21, No. 3 (2017): https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/fjhr20/21/3

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Thursday 28th of February 2019 – 11am

Economic and Social History Seminars

Title: Tramps’ Tales: vagrancy at the dawn of the 20th century in Britain

Nick Crowson (University of Birmingham)

Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House, Bute Gardens. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

 

Wednesday 6th of March 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Speaker: Leah Bassell (Roe Hampton)

Bio: Leah’s research interests include the political sociology of migration, intersectionality and citizenship. She has explored these topics in England, Scotland, France and Canada. Leah completed her DPhil From Refugee Woman to Citizen: The Politics of Integration in France and Canada at Nuffield College/Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford where she was a Commonwealth Scholar.  She held Postdoctoral Research Fellowships at the Refugee Studies Centre/Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford funded by the ESRC and with the Group for the Study of Ethnicity, Racism, Migration and Exclusion at the Institute of Sociology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. Before pursuing an academic career, Leah was an emergency outreach worker in Paris, where she provided humanitarian assistance to asylum seekers and created a circus camp project for refugee youth.

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Wednesday 13th of March 2019 – 3.30pm

GRAMNET Seminars Series

Speaker: Mia Gubbay and Shruti Narayanswamy

Everyone is welcome.  If you would like to attend, please RSVP to David.Wright@glasgow.ac.uk.

Venue: Fore Hall, Main Building, University of Glasgow. Tea/coffee and home baking will be served from 3.00pm in the Atrium.

 

Wednesday 13th of March 2019 – 5.45pm doors for 6.00pm start

GRAMNET Film Series

Ouaga Girls
Documentary: Sweden, Burkina Faso, France, Quatar (2017)
Director: Teresa-Traore Dahlberg
Running time: 83 mins
Mooré and French with English subtitles

A group of young women tweak machines and hammer away at a school for auto mechanics in Ouagadougou in this poetic story about life choices, sisterhood and the endeavor to find your own way.
In a country with youth unemployment at 52 percent, jobs are a hot issue. The young girls at a mechanics school in Burkina Faso’s capital, Ouagadougou are right in the middle of a crucial point in life when their dreams, hopes and courage are confronted with opinions, fears and society’s expectations of what a woman should be. Using interesting narrative solutions, Theresa Traore Dahlberg depicts their last school years and at the same time succeeds at showing the country’s violent past and present. This is a debut feature and coming-of-age film with much warmth, laughs, heartbreak and depth.

Our film series is organised in partnership with BEMIS Scotland and The Iona Community, with the support of the University of Glasgow’s Equality and Diversity Unit.

Screenings are accompanied by Q&A sessions for everyone to share views and thoughts in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Venue: Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

 

Thursday 14th of March 2019 – 3pm

Urban Studies Seminars

Speaker: Dr Louise Reid (University of St Andrews)

Venue: Adam Smith 916

 

Thursday 14th of March 2019 – 4pm

★ ★ ★ 2019 Frisby Memorial Lecture  ★ ★ ★

Title: What We Learn From Music: Hidden Musical Lives and the Craft of Understanding Society

Les Back (Goldsmiths)

Abstract: Sociologists are often secret musicians.  This goes all the way back to W.E.B. Du Bois and Max Weber for whom musical life was always woven into their sociological thinking.  In recent times, there have been numerous appeals to use music to reimagine sociology itself.  For example, David Beer has called for a punk sociology – as urgent and vital like a Clash single – as an antidote to the showy and technical ‘prog rock’ tendencies in the mainstream discipline. This talk develops the idea of doing sociology with music through focusing on the hidden musical lives of sociologists.  It explores a range of examples from Howard Becker’s grounding in–D field research as a pianist in the Chicago jazz clubs and his theories of deviance and labelling to the impact playing the guitar has had on Paul Gilroy’s understanding the cultures of the African diaspora to the connection between Emma Jackson’s life as a bass player in Brit pop band Kenicke and her feminist punk sociology.  It will argue that sociologists learn a great deal from music both in terms the insights it produces into the workings of culture and society but also in terms of how it sustains our sociological imagination and inspires us to make sociology differently.

About our speaker: Les Back is Professor of sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. His work attempts to create a sensuous or live sociology committed to searching for new modes of sociological writing and representation. This approach is outlined in his book The Art of Listening (Berg 2007).  He has largely conducted ethnographic studies of race and racism, popular culture including sport and music focusing largely on London but he has also done fieldwork in the American South.  His books include New Ethinicities and Urban Culture (UCL 1996), The Changing Face of Football: Racism, Identity and Multiculture in the English Game (with Tim Crabbe and John Solomos Berg 2001) and Out of Whiteness: Color, Politics and Culture (with Vron Ware University of Chicago Press, 2002).   He also writes journalism and has made documentary films.  In 2016 he published a book entitled Academic Diary: Or Why Higher Education Still Matters and most recently he publsihed Migrant City (2018) with Shamser Sinha, Charlynne Bryan, Vlad Baraku and Mardouche Yembi which is the story of contemporary London over the last ten years told from the vantage point of thirty adult migrants.

 

Wednesday 20th of March 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: Mountains before mountaineering, environment before environmentalism: valuing landscape in early modern Europe

Dawn Hollis (University of St Andrews) (To be confirmed)

Abstract: Traditional narratives of European mountain history assert that before the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century developments of ‘the sublime’ and of modern mountaineering, people tended to avoid and fear mountains. This paper will deconstruct this narrative by sharing just a few of the many rich stories of early modern (c.1500-1700) mountain engagements: German diplomats climbing Persian mountains on Christmas Day, Scottish pilgrims rescuing monks from falling off mountain paths in the Holy Land. It will also suggest that the early modern European view of mountains was, in fact, one which centred around the idea of high-altitude landscapes as a vital part of an inter-connected environment. In short, this paper will tell of the mountain adventures which occurred before modern mountaineering, and the appreciation for environment expressed through mountains before modern environmentalism.

Bio: Dawn Hollis is Leverhulme Postdoctoral Research Fellow at St. Andrews where she received her PhD in History. Her research is largely focused upon the human experience of mountains and mountainous landscapes in a variety of past contexts and periods. She explores the construction of mountaineering as a modern sport and the impact of Scriptural and classical associations upon early modern understandings of the mountain landscape. Her particular interests also include the current-day historiographical discourses surrounding the question of premodern mountain engagement, and in investigating their origins, nuances, and problematic impact upon our scholarly understanding of past landscape experience. She is working on a Leverhulme-funded project ‘Mountains in ancient literature and culture and their postclassical reception’, with a focus on the writings of seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century travellers to the classical world and considering the numerous influences upon their reactions to mountain sites of ancient and contemporary significance.

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Wednesday 20th of March 2019 – 5.15 – 5.30pm

GRAMNET Book Club

We’ll be discussing Hisham Matar’s The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land In Between.

Everyone is welcome.

Venue: Cafe Bennu (upstairs), 262 Woodlands Road, Glasgow G3 6NE

 

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 – 3.30pm

GRAMNET Seminars Series

Speaker: Olivier Esteves, Professor of British Studies, University of Lille

Everyone is welcome.  If you would like to attend, please RSVP to David.Wright@glasgow.ac.uk.

Venue: Gannochy Seminar Room, Wolfson Medical School Building, University of Glasgow. Tea/coffee and home baking will be served from 3.00pm in the Atrium.

 

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: We are the European family’: unsettling the role of the family in belonging, race, nation and the European project

Hanna Jones (University of Warwick)

Abstract: In the Brexit referendum debates and their aftermath, one popular call to solidarity within the EU came from artist Wolfgang Tillmans, who released a series of posters with slogans intended to rally voters to remain the EU. This article takes one of those calls – ‘It’s a question of where you feel you belong. We are the European family.’ – as a starting point to examine the openings and closures made available through calls to (trans)national solidarity on the basis of family. Drawing on critical autobiographical work alongside critical analysis of trends in bordering and race politics, the paper points to the multi-layered and colonially-inflected histories of ‘family’ in relation to national and continental belonging. Beginning with the sense of uncertainty over belonging and connection stirred up by Brexit, the paper acknowledges the comfort found by some in the seeming security of family. However, the paper then engages with alternative realities of ‘the European family’ – families separated by border controls, racialised as defective, or oppressed by heteronormative patriarchy – and unsettles the problematic of ‘European’ in ‘the European family’. The paper asks whether ‘family’ can be used to reimagine transnational solidarity, or whether this is ultimately an always-exclusionary structure.

Bio: Hannah is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, and has worked at Warwick since 2013. Hannah worked in London local government before completing her PhD in the Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London. She also holds degrees in Human Sciences (University of Oxford) and Policy Studies (University of Edinburgh). She has been a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Public Knowledge, New York University; a Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London; a Research Associate at the Centre for Migration, Policy and Society, University of Oxford; and a Research Associate in the Department of Social Policy and Criminology, The Open University. She is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Thursday 4th of April 2019 – 3pm

Urban Studies Seminars

Prof Paul Langley (University of Durham)

Venue: Adam Smith 916

 

Wednesday 10th of April 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: What’s the Problem? Making sense of public issues and private troubles

Sharon Greenwood (University of Glasgow)

Abstract: Research conducted over the past twenty years has demonstrated the impact of parental ‘problem’ substance use on the lives of young adults (Velleman & Orford, 1999; Bancroft et al, 2004; Järvinen, 2013). Despite this increased awareness, policymakers in the UK and beyond continue to exclude young adults affected by a parent’s drinking or drug use in their definition of ‘affected others’. Consequently, affected young adults find it difficult to access support from public or third sector organisations, leaving them reliant on informal, ‘fragile webs of support’ (Bancroft et al, 2004). This paper uses Bacchi’s (2009) ‘What’s the Problem Represented to be?’ (WPR) model as an analytical lens to explore the discrepancy between public and private definitions of the ‘problem’ of parental substance use for young adults. Whilst Bacchi’s approach was intended to be used for policy analysis, this paper emphasises the transferability of the approach in understanding complex ‘personal troubles’ (Mills, 1990 [1967]; Emerson, 2015). I begin by critically analysing the ways that UK and Scottish Government policy defines the ‘problem’. Following this, I share data gathered via minimally structured interviews with affected young people (aged 16 – 30) to highlight the complex nature of ‘sense making’, that young people engage in. Bacchi’s WPR approach allows the incongruity between public and private problem definitions to become illuminated. It allows us to garner a more fruitful understanding of the barriers to help seeking experienced by this group (Dixon-Woods et al, 2006; Mackenzie et al, 2015) and move beyond the discourse of ‘stigma’. I conclude by arguing for developing a relational approach to understanding the impact of parental substance use on young adults – where both the ‘problem’ and ‘solution’ are defined by those with lived experience.

Bio: Dr Sharon Greenwood is currently a tutor in Social & Public Policy and Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow. Her research interests include drug and alcohol use in society (particularly the impact on ‘affected others’), the relationship between ideology and public policy, and the lived experience of health and wellness in Scotland. In 2017, she co-founded DAWF – Drugs, Alcohol, Women, and Families – a research network of academics and practitioners.

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 – 4pm

Sociology Seminars Series

Title: Left Problems, Nationalism and the Crisis

Sivamohan Valluvan (University of Warwick)

Abstract: In spite of the rise of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party, an emboldened nationalism that had already consolidated itself at the centre of British politics remains confidently intact. After all, much of the past decade had seen nationalism become the most reliable broker of electoral power. It had informed the rise of far-right populisms whilst also fortifying centre-right rule. These nationalisms manifest along multiple registers. At times, the emphasis is economic protectionism. Elsewhere, it rails, against the dictates and opacity of various supranational institutions, not least the EU. Sometimes, it amounts primarily to a nostalgia for the ‘green and pleasant’ land. Common however to all forms is the compulsion to place the bulk of a society’s challenges at the door of racialised ethnic communities, domestic and foreign.  So, as western capitalism reneges on the welfare contract, creating a new political vacuum, it is painfully frustrating that nationalism is rehabilitated as the most likely custodian of political discourse. And it is doubly frustrating that some who propagate for a left alternative also seem wedded to the nation – in asserting control over migration, over defence, over security, and over how we imagine our everyday sense of community. As these frustrations multiply, this talk will provide a more historically attuned analysis of the relationship in Britain between the current crisis and xeno-racist nationalism – including an engagement with the myths surrounding whiteness and the working class. On the one hand, I wish to press the importance of recognising the central role of racial nationalism in recent governance. On the other, I want to contend that any alternative left visions for governance must, as a minimum, start with the repudiation of nationalism and also of the  left’s routine submission to such nationalism. It is my wider argument that such repudiation can only manifest through a solid understanding of the contemporary crisis in which these nationalisms arise.

Bio: Sivamohan Valluvan is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick. Valluvan has written widely in the areas of racism and ethnicity, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, consumerism, and social and cultural theory more broadly. His forthcoming book, The Nationalist Cacophony, will be published later this year by Manchester University Press.

Venue: Boyd Orr 513

 

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 – 5.45pm doors for 6.00pm start

GRAMNET Film Series

Beyond Borders: Stories of Freedom and Friendship
Animation: Germany (2018)
Directors: Sandra Dajani, Nazgol Emami, Johanna Bentz, Madeleine Dallmeyer, Camilo Colmenares, Diana Menestrey, Khaled Nawal
Running time: 80 mins
Nepali with English subtitles

Films for refugee children, for their friends and for everyone else. This creative documentary (episode film) without dialogues takes the viewer on a journey into children’s worlds of different countries, real and dreamed. Ola befriends a giant, a boy from Jordan learns to laugh again, a magnifying glass leads us into a dream world and creates a new friendship, Jumana longs for their homeland and simply turns Germany upside down over and over again. In these cinematic miniatures, which were designed by filmmakers from countries such as Syria, Iran, Jordan, Germany and Colombia, the whole emotional range of refugee children is renegotiated.

This event is presented in partnership with UNESCO Chair Refugee Integration Through Languages and the Arts at the University of Glasgow.

Our film series is organised in partnership with BEMIS Scotland and The Iona Community, with the support of the University of Glasgow’s Equality and Diversity Unit.

Screenings are accompanied by Q&A sessions for everyone to share views and thoughts in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Venue: Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

 

Thursday 9th of May 2019 – 11am

Economic and Social History Seminars

Speaker: Matthias Kipping (Schulich School of Business, York University, Toronto)

Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House, Bute Gardens. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

 

Thursday 9th of May 2019 – 3pm

Urban Studies Seminars

Speaker: Prof Mike Raco (UCL)

Venue: St Andrews, 433AB

 

Wednesday 15th of May 2019 – 5.45pm doors for 6.00pm start

GRAMNET Film Series

Stitching Palestine
Documentary: Palestine (2017)
Director: Carol Mansour
Running time: 78 mins
Arabic with English subtitles

Twelve Palestinian women sit before us and talk of their life before the Diaspora, of their memories, of their lives and of their identity. Their narratives are connected by the enduring thread of the ancient art of embroidery.  Twelve resilient, determined and articulate women from disparate walks of life: lawyers, artists, housewives, activists, architects and politicians stitch together the story of their homeland, of their dispossession, and of their unwavering determination that justice will prevail.

Through their stories, the individual weaves into the collective, yet remaining distinctly personal.

Twelve women, twelve life-spans and stories from Palestine; a land whose position was fixed on the map of the world, but is now embroidered on its face.‌

Our film series is organised in partnership with BEMIS Scotland and The Iona Community, with the support of the University of Glasgow’s Equality and Diversity Unit.

Screenings are accompanied by Q&A sessions for everyone to share views and thoughts in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Venue: Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD

 

Thursday 6th of June 2019 – 3pm

Urban Studies Seminars

Speaker: Prof Alan Mace (LSE)

Venue: Adam Smith 916

 

Wednesday 19th of June 2019 – 5.45pm doors for 6.00pm start

GRAMNET Film Series

Lady of the Harbour
Documentary: The Netherlands, China (2017)
Director: Sean Wang
Running time: 90 mins
Chinese, Greek and English with English subtitles

Nearly two decades ago, Chinese immigrants came to Greece traveling along the similar route as the current refugees. Suzanne is one of them. Before moving to Greece, she had developed a successful business in Bulgaria and was friends with the then Bulgarian prime minister, mafia bosses and celebrities. When the refugee crisis arises, Suzanne decides to organize a Greek Chinese volunteer team to help as an act of redemption for her past. It is not easy – Suzanne struggles to persuade business-oriented Chinese bosses and companies to join and has to face the sarcastic attitude of Western volunteers. Suzanne’s dominant character also does not help. Against all odds, Suzanne gains a lot in the process, and so do her teammates.

The screening is sponsored by the Confucius Institute at the University of Glasgow. www.glasgow.ac.uk/confucius.

Our film series is organised in partnership with BEMIS Scotland and The Iona Community, with the support of the University of Glasgow’s Equality and Diversity Unit.

Screenings are accompanied by Q&A sessions for everyone to share views and thoughts in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Venue: Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD